Marianne Ratier

Papier Mâché

Illustration (version digitale) et interview pour le très beau magazine australien de mode enfantine Papier Mâché.

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   When did you first decide you wanted to be an artist?   When I was a little girl I wanted to make kids’ books. But after my Baccalaureate, I thought it would be too difficult to make a good living from drawing. So I went on to study Art, and then Applied Arts. After which I worked in advertising for a while. I was kind of circling around my dream. One day, I was brave enough to quit my job and set about achieving my real goal.   Tell us a bit more about yourself. Where did you grow up? Were you a dreamer as a child?  I grew up between Paris and L’Île d’Yeu (an island just off the French Vendée region) where I used to spend all my holidays. When I was there, I loved building huts, and bringing my pencils and other knick knacks into them to write stories. I filled notebooks with disaster stories about Santa Claus, mini cartoons, tales of animals with special powers... creating other worlds.   Do you draw on your childhood experiences and memories when drawing /creating?  Above all, I try to remember the outlook on things I had as a kid. In those days nothing seemed impossible; kids have their own logic, which can be very funny.   Can you remember the first thing you ever drew?  I managed to copy a Petit Pony drawing book. I was so proud to have worked out how to do that, that I kept drawing it.   You recently collaborated with one of our favourite French labels QUENOTTE ; what inspired you to start working in the children’s industry?  Children are very imaginative and their observational sense is very acute. This ties in exactly with what I love to develop in my own work: its surrealism, and lots of other little aspects.    In this issue are talking ‘happiness’ ... whether it be a place, a dance, a thought, a dream or a single moment... a quiet place where you are contented. Tell us a little about your happy place -- real or imaginary.  For me it has to be a place -- L’Île d’Yeu , the island where I spent my holidays as a kid; I still go back there as often as possible. I know every corner of the island, and right now just thinking of going there is making me excited.   What do you love most about being an artist?  The freedom to create... when one is not drawing to order. But I do realize that very often, such unlimited freedom can actually block one creatively. It is really hard to work without any constraints.   Where are you drawing your inspiration from at the moment?  Old-fashioned wallpaper -- the kind you find in Grand-mother’s house. Its patterns fascinate me, and make me really want to work on it.   Can you share a wish with us?   My wish is … to go on telling stories!

When did you first decide you wanted to be an artist? 
When I was a little girl I wanted to make kids’ books. But after my Baccalaureate, I thought it would be too difficult to make a good living from drawing. So I went on to study Art, and then Applied Arts. After which I worked in advertising for a while. I was kind of circling around my dream. One day, I was brave enough to quit my job and set about achieving my real goal.

Tell us a bit more about yourself. Where did you grow up? Were you a dreamer as a child?
I grew up between Paris and L’Île d’Yeu (an island just off the French Vendée region) where I used to spend all my holidays. When I was there, I loved building huts, and bringing my pencils and other knick knacks into them to write stories. I filled notebooks with disaster stories about Santa Claus, mini cartoons, tales of animals with special powers... creating other worlds.

Do you draw on your childhood experiences and memories when drawing /creating?
Above all, I try to remember the outlook on things I had as a kid. In those days nothing seemed impossible; kids have their own logic, which can be very funny.

Can you remember the first thing you ever drew?
I managed to copy a Petit Pony drawing book. I was so proud to have worked out how to do that, that I kept drawing it.

You recently collaborated with one of our favourite French labels QUENOTTE ; what inspired you to start working in the children’s industry?
Children are very imaginative and their observational sense is very acute. This ties in exactly with what I love to develop in my own work: its surrealism, and lots of other little aspects. 

In this issue are talking ‘happiness’ ... whether it be a place, a dance, a thought, a dream or a single moment... a quiet place where you are contented. Tell us a little about your happy place -- real or imaginary.
For me it has to be a place -- L’Île d’Yeu , the island where I spent my holidays as a kid; I still go back there as often as possible. I know every corner of the island, and right now just thinking of going there is making me excited.

What do you love most about being an artist?
The freedom to create... when one is not drawing to order. But I do realize that very often, such unlimited freedom can actually block one creatively. It is really hard to work without any constraints.

Where are you drawing your inspiration from at the moment?
Old-fashioned wallpaper -- the kind you find in Grand-mother’s house. Its patterns fascinate me, and make me really want to work on it.

Can you share a wish with us? 
My wish is … to go on telling stories!